Nov 242014
 

From Out of the Strength Came Forth Sweetness

Honey plays a central role in the food of all pre-industrial societies. The Western World’s oldest text, the Old Testament or Talmud, tells of much about honey. For the Bushmen of the Kalahari it is edible gold. You could kill a person for raiding one of your hives. Even today in Ethiopia wild honey is a basic food group.

Could we have some butter for out breakfast toast, we asked waiter Habtamu Getachew in the Mountain View Hotel. (There are no surnames as we know them. Getachew is his father’s name; children, boys at any rate, take their father’s name as their surname.)
No butter.
Could we then have some margarine (yuk)?
No margarine.
What could we have then?
Honey. Wild honey.
Okay fine. Lovely. And why are you looking so tired.

Our waiter Habtamu Getachew at the Mountain View Hotel in Lalibela, Ethiopia.

Our waiter Habtamu Getachew at the Mountain View Hotel in Lalibela, Ethiopia.

Turns out Habtamu had been up all night at church, at a service to which we had been invited but ducked out of. We’d been up at around 4:30 am each day to get to the stone churches to get the photography done before the noisy tourists arrived at 9 am sharp each day. Which is when we’d retire back to the hotel for breakfast.

Habtamu told us whenever he has a day off he walks about five hours to his family home down the valley, not far from where King Lalibela was born at Kudues Harbe. There he goes and collects wild honey. Honey in this place is much than just sweet food. Honey is the only food that never spoils, it has a mild antibiotic action and can be used to cover burns, among its many wondrous properties. It is quite simply nature’s wonder food.

When a young minor prince was born, nearly 1,000 years ago in the north of the ancient kingdom of Axum, a swarm of bees surrounded the crib. “Lalibela” cried his royal mother, “the bees recognise his sovereignty!” There was a belief that animals could foretell important events.

The child was named Lalibela. He did eventually become king and it was he who, apparently, directed by God, built the 11 stone churches here that are now a World Heritage Site and one of the man-made wonders of the world. They are hewn from the volcanic rock mountainside. But what is most amazing about them is how they were constructed.

Actually they were deconstructed – the rock had to be tunnelled into and then, instead of building from the ground up, all the negative spaces inside the subterranean churches had to be chiseled away. Conceptually, it was a feat of extraordinary genius. From the strength of solid rock, was wrought fantastical architectural sweetness.

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